Broiled Beholder and Other Dungeon Delicacies

TUMBLR ASK:  Specifically during the Curse of Strahd/Domains of Dread campaign, what were Prianna's opinions on the Vistani? Were the...

Recipe: Rosemary Manriklo

TUMBLR ASK: Specifically during the Curse of Strahd/Domains of Dread campaign, what were Prianna's opinions on the Vistani? Were they friendly to her? Did she spend time with them at all past the bare minimum?
I have always felt a deep connection with the Vistani people, and Madam Eva herself gave me my new surname after the separation from my family. The Vistani women are power houses, strong in mind and spirit, something that I wish I could be. I have so much respect and love for their very unique way of life. I wish I could spend more time with them. Even when we haven't seen eye-to-eye, there was something incredibly warm and welcoming about the way they lived, and I've been welcomed with open arms many times. I currently have my own Vistani-style wagon, one that myself and my family live in as we make our way across the lands, and I treasure it so much. It feels the most like home of any place I've lived thus far. Amazing how something on wheels can still have that feeling attached to it.

[Player's Note: Manriklo is a traditional Romani fried bread - Romani being the real-world culture that the Vistani have been developed from. I went as authentic as possible with this one.] 

Rosemary Manriklo

Ingredients:
- 1 cup corn meal
- 1/2 cup water
- 1 tsp salt
- 1 tsp black pepper
- 1 tbsp dill
- 1 tbsp rosemary
- Crumbled pork bacon
- 1/2 cup chosen cheese (Prianna has marked camembert here for her own tastes)
- Olive oil, for cooking

Directions:
Combine the corn meal, crumbled bacon, herbs, and cheese well. Add in the water, warmed, to make a simple dough from the mixture. Douse your fingers in oil and flick some drops into the mixture as you knead it, then divide into six separate balls. Roll each ball on a floured surface, about as thin as a standard plate.
Add oil to a skillet, and heat over a medium-high flame. Cook each dough disk one at a time, until it bubbles and browns. Remove the fried bread from heat and serve immediately.

TUMBLR ASK:  As a half elf, do you feel any kind of fusion or crossover from human and elven food? There are many things that both elv...

Recipe: Roasted Beet Soup

TUMBLR ASK: As a half elf, do you feel any kind of fusion or crossover from human and elven food?

There are many things that both elves and humans eat regularly, but there is a definite preference in each. Elven patrons and customers always seem to prefer lighter foods, things that don't rest heavily on their bodies after they're done eating. Humans like things to be "stick to your ribs", with a lot of meats, or even heavier vegetables like squashes or potatoes. But you know what? If you put an elf and a human through the same awful circumstances... when they have to face loss, terror, pain, agony... they will all gravitate to the same bowl of hot and comforting soup. Soup really does soothe the worst pain that the world can inflict on a person.

Roasted Beet Soup

Ingredients:
- 6 beets, trimmed of their tops
- One entire garlic
- 6 tbsp olive oil
- 1 carrot
- 1 onion
- 4 tbsp chopped parsley
- 4 cups of water
- 1/4 cup of red wine
- 1 tbsp salt
- 1 tbsp black pepper

Directions:
Cut the beets in half. Separate the garlic cloves, and remove their papery exteriors. Drizzle half of the olive oil over the beets and garlic, and place on a baking pan. Bake in a high-flame oven for forty-five minutes until everything is thoroughly roasted.
Pour the rest of the oil into a deep pot, and cook the chopped carrot and onion, then add the beets and garlic to the mixture. Add in the water and boil. Turn the heat down after 5 minutes, add in the wine and herbs, and simmer. This can take from only twenty minutes to even two hours, until all of the vegetables are extremely soft. If any vegetables refuse to break down into a creamy soup, use a pestle to grind them down further, and return to the soup. Serve. 

TUMBLR ASK:  Do a recipe that was inspired by Victor. She loves/knows the guy in many different storylines/campaigns/alternate realities,...

Recipe: Dark Chocolate Macarons

TUMBLR ASK: Do a recipe that was inspired by Victor. She loves/knows the guy in many different storylines/campaigns/alternate realities, so maybe something a little versatile? Or something that strikes true to the core of his character?

I didn't know that I actually believed in fate until I met Victor. There is no other explanation for why someone who completes me this much has entered my life, especially when I've been beaten down with so much pain and heartache. This man has a darkness to him, rich and luxurious, something that's palpable whenever I'm standing at his side. Yet that darkness doesn't consume him. It's balanced by fragility, tenderness, and a sweetness that coaxes away any of the sharp or bitter edges that he might present. He offers a sense of comfort when things become heavy, just being in his presence makes me feel like a queen. He is decadence personified. I will never love another the way I love this man.

Dark Chocolate Macarons

Ingredients:
SHELLS:
- 2/3 cup almonds
- 1 cup sugar, ground into a fine powder with a pestle
- 1 egg
- 1/4 cup sugar, non-ground
- 1/4 cup bittersweet chocolate, melted
FILLING:
- 1/3 lb bittersweet chocolate
- 1/2 cup heavy cream
- 4 tbsp butter
- 1/3 cup sugar, ground into a fine powder with a pestle
- 1 tbsp corn syrup
- 1 tsp salt
- 1 cup red currants
- 1/4 cup blackberries
- 1 cup raspberries
- 1 cup sugar, non-ground

Directions:
FOR THE SHELLS: Blanch the almonds. Using a mortar and pestle, grind them down to a very fine powdery state, and add the ground sugar, continuing to work until it becomes a well-blended powder combination. Sieve this mixture well, and grind whatever solids are left to mimic the rest of the powder. Separate the egg white and whisk with the non-ground sugar, and chocolate. Whisk until it's stiff, and your arm feels like it is about to pack up and leave the rest of your body. Add in the almond mixture, and fold in very caefully and thoroughly. Fill a pastry bag with this mixture, and line a baking sheet with parchment. Pipe 1/2 inch above the sheet and make rounds slightly smaller than an inch in diameter. Space one inch apart. Tap to release bubbles, and then bake in a medium-high flamed oven for 12 minutes. Only bake one sheet's worth at a time.
FOR THE FILLING: While all the macarons are baking, sieve all the berries to get a relatively seed-free puree from them, and combine in a pot with the sugar and cook over a medium flame for fifteen to twenty minutes, as needed to thicken. Allow to cool a bit, then transfer into a chilled area.
In a small pot, over very low flame, combine the chocolate, cream, butter, syrup, and salt, and allow the chocolate to melt well, and becomes very shiny. Cool until it thickens substantially, then whisk it until fluffy. Pipe a swirl of the chocolate mixture onto one half of each macaron, and dollop some berry jam into the center. Press a macaron onto the top to sandwich it all together.

Evening Gamers! It has been a while since I have posted any roleplaying stuff and after a few conversations with fellow gamers (and...

Curios: What's in the Kitchen?


Evening Gamers!

It has been a while since I have posted any roleplaying stuff and after a few conversations with fellow gamers (and one really good post on Dungeons and Donuts you can read HERE.) I came up with the idea for a new series of articles. Curios will be a periodical article that will feature tables and flavor to enhance various locations.

What’s in the Kitchen features a number of dishes and knick knacks that players may find in any area being used to cook or prepare food. I have also decided to incorporate one of my favorite feats from 5th Edition D&D called ‘Gourmand’. While I encourage DMs to use skill checks to identify the unusual ingredients found below, those with the Gourmand feat can identify each after sampling them. This feat and a bunch of other great ones are part of the Unearthed Arcana series and can be found HERE.

d12 - Curio

  1. A large iron pot holds a thick creamy soup filled with bits of unknown meat. Gourmand: Berbalang Cheese Soup 
  2. A large marble mortar and pestle gathers dust on one high shelf. A fine dust partially fills the bowl and a closer inspection reveals a human tooth.
  3. Several long thing pastry tubes rest on the counter, filled with a spicy smelly meat. Gourmand: Behir Rolls 
  4. A large wok rests against the wall covered in soot from heavy use. Scrubbing it clean reveals that it is made from Adamantium.
  5. Inside the oven you find a small sheet holding a dozen puffy triangles. The filling is sweet with earthy undertones. Gourmand: Goodberry and Rhubarb Turnovers 
  6. A bloody cleaver is wedged deeply into a cutting block, the name ‘Barry’ carved into the thick handle.
  7. A small metal tin contains a variety of thin light brown shards, studded with some kind of nut. Though hard to bite through it tastes both sweet and salty. Gourmand: Peanut Brittle 
  8. Within a cupboard, you find a worn cookbook the large heavy tome obviously well loved. On the inside cover, an inscription reads “To help you to get a start with your new restaurant. - Prianna
  9. A small pie sits cooling on a window sill, adorned with several apples cut to look like roses. Someone has apparently used their hands to scoop out a small piece, perhaps a small child or halfling. Gourmand: Blooming Rose Creme Pie 
  10. A wooden box made of walnut opens to reveal a velvet lining. Upon the rich blue fabric rests a full set of silverware whose onyx stone handles are carved into the form of horses.
  11. A half dozen figs, filled with cheese and drizzled with honey and almonds, sit arrayed in a semi-circle upon a plate. Gourmand: Almond and Honey Stuffed Figs
  12. A thick cut steak, grilled to perfection, smelling of pear and brown sugar. Gourmand: Chile Glazed Basilisk Steaks 

d6 - Senses

  1. The smell of mold and damp fills the space and the air has a faint hazy quality.
  2. This room smells pleasantly sweet, its surfaces spotless in their cleanliness.
  3. You instantly pick up the caustic smell of blood the moment you set foot in the room. The old scent is almost overpowering.
  4. The smell of fresh baked bread explodes out of this room, surrounding you in warmth.
  5. Old chains and hooks dangle from the ceiling in the far corner of the room, above a single iron grate. Tattered pieces of meat still remain giving off the foul smell of rot and decay.
  6. A powerful earthy smell hits you as you step into the room. One entire wall appears to be overgrown with various edible plants and herbs.



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Regardless of my family's almost barbaric treatment of the creatures, their meat did provide a lot of joy to the customers that cam...

Recipe: Berbalang Cheese Soup


Regardless of my family's almost barbaric treatment of the creatures, their meat did provide a lot of joy to the customers that came into the restaurant. I believe that adding cheese and cream to any dish also helps that, turning this into a divine and scrumptious joy... now if only I could find a less awful way to harvest the meat for my own needs.

Berbalang Cheese Soup

Ingredients:
- 1 lb of berbalang meat, cut into thin strips (leave fat on)
- 2 tsp garlic, minced
- 1 tsp black pepper
- 1 tsp salt
- 2 tbsp olive oil
- 1/2 cup milk
- 2 cups chicken broth
- 2 cups heavy cream
- 1 lb chicken breast, skinned and cubed
- 6 tbsp butter
- 6 tbsp flour
- 3 cups shredded cheddar cheese
- 1 cup cream cheese
Directions:
Assemble the strips of berbalang meat on a baking sheet, and bake in an oven set to a medium-high flame, for about fifteen minutes until crispy, remove, and let drain from their juices and grease. Chop into tiny bits.
Heat oil in a pan and add in the chicken, cooking for ten minutes, stirring frequently. Pour in the chicken broth, cook another ten minutes, then shred the chicken inside of the broth. Melt butter into a soup pot, and mix with garlic. Whisk in flour, pepper, and salt. Cook over a medium flame until it simmers, and add in the cheeses, stirring until melted. Add in chicken, stock, and berbalang meat. Top with more berbalang meat crumbles for garnish.

I will eat these forever. Another basilisk was brought in, the fee was paid, and in my experiments with the other ingredients the party d...

Recipe: Tangy Basilisk Stuffed Shells

I will eat these forever. Another basilisk was brought in, the fee was paid, and in my experiments with the other ingredients the party delivered, I came up with these divine creations. I discovered the art of the large shell-style pasta at the lord's manor - he requested I attend dinner with him, and I was very happy to. These shells were served - stuffed with cheese, something he thought I might enjoy learning from his personal chef. It was a whirlwind of experiments with fillings ever since, but these... these are heavenly.

Tangy Basilisk Stuffed Shells

Ingredients:
- 1 1/2 lb ground basilisk meat
- 1 finely diced onion
- 1 finely diced green pepper
- 1/4 cup brown sugar
- 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
- 1 tsp crushed garlic
- 1 tsp mustard
- 1 tsp cinnamon
- 2 cups tomato sauce
- 2 tbsp tomato paste
- 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
- 2 tbsp olive oil
- 12 to 15 large pasta shells, cooked

Directions:
Over a medium-high flame, heat the oil in a pan and thoroughly cook the basilisk until no pink hue remains. Add in the brown sugar, the onion and peppers, vinegar, garlic, mustard, and cinnamon. Cook for an additional five minutes, then add tomato sauce and paste. Stir well, reduce heat, and simmer until sauce thickens into the meat. Stir in one cup of the cheese to allow it to melt.
In a long baking pan, spread a small amount of meat sauce on the bottom, then arrange the shells - open side up - on top. Spoon filling into each shell, then top with remaining cheese. Bake in a medium flame oven for 25 minutes. Top with greens if preferred.

I'm always surprised just how much use I get out of the larger creatures. Given that some of them only have small portions of edible ...

Recipe: Apple Basilisk Burgers

I'm always surprised just how much use I get out of the larger creatures. Given that some of them only have small portions of edible meat on their bodies, but the basilisk, depending on it's prior diet, can supply me with a festival's worth of meat if I use it properly. It's not a creature I get to put on the menu often, not a lot of adventurers are eager to put their swords and spells against it for the measly rewards I pay out, but when I do--- boy, when I do...

Apple Basilisk Burgers

Ingredients:
- 1 lb of basilisk meat, finely ground
- 1 apple, preferably red or yellow, completely shredded
- 3 sliced green onions
- 3 tbsp apple juice, freshly squeezed if possible
- 1 tsp mustard seeds
- 1 tsp salt
- 1 tsp pepper
- 2 tablespoons brown mustard
- 1 tablespoon honey
- Rolls, one per sandwich, sliced in half
- Cheddar cheese slices, one per sandwich
- Red or yellow apple, sliced lengthways, to top the sandwich with

Directions:
In a bowl, combine all ingredients, aside from the brown mustard and honey. Mix with your hands for the best effect, and do not overmix. Separate into four patties. Heat a pan over medium heat and add a tiny bit of butter to grease it - apply the patties once the butter is melted. Cook for five minutes on each side.
Add the cheese to the tops and allow to cook for an additional minute to melt.
Whisk together the brown mustard and honey. Put the burgers on the rolls, top with honey mustard, apple slices, and the tops of the rolls. Serve.